Archive for the ‘IDEs’ Category.

How to create a copy of a control’s default style?

Sometimes you need to make some advanced styling changes to a default control, such as a RadioButton, ListBox, DataGrid, Button, etc. However, you may want to keep the majority of the default style the way it is.

In Expression Blend, this is easy to do. If you don’t have Expression Blend and you are developing in WPF, get it immediately. There is a trial version you can test out.

Here is how to get your copy of any control’s default style….

Read more on my new WPF Sharp site
How to create a copy of a control’s default style?

10 Step process for developing a new WPF application the right way using C#

It makes a difference if you do something the right way from the beginning.  Everything seems to work out so much better and takes less time over all.

Here are some basic steps that I have learned will help you do it right the first time. These steps are from my experience, mostly because I did it wrong the first few times.  These are not exact steps. They are subject to change and improve.  In fact, you might have improvements to suggest immediately when you read this. But if you are new to WPF, then reading these steps before you start and following them, will have you closer it doing it the right way the first time.  It is much more pleasant to tweak a pretty good process than it is to go in with no idea for a process and do it wrong.

Step 1 – Prepare the idea

  1. Some one has an idea
  2. Determine the minimal features for release 1.
  3. Determine the minimal features for release 2.
    1. Alter minimal features for release 1 if it makes sense to do so.
  4. Determine the minimal features for release 3.
    1. Alter minimal features for release 1 and 2 if it makes sense to do so.

Step 2 – Design the Application’s back end business logic (simultaneous to Step 3)

  1. Design the backend
  2. Apply the “Keep it simple” idea to the business logic and makes changes as necessary.
  3. Apply the “Keep it secure” idea to the business logic and makes changes as necessary.
  4. Repeats steps 2 and 3 if necessary.
  5. Backend development can start now as the UI and the back end should not need to know about each other, though this coding is listed as the Step 5 item.

Step 3 – Design the UI using WPF (simultaneous to Step 2)

  1. Determine what development model should be used to separate the UI from the business logic.
    1. Model-View-ViewModel (MVVM) is the model I recommend for WPF.
    2. Gather libraries used for the model (such as common MVVM libraries that include the common ViewModelBase and RelayCommand objects)
  2. Consider using a 3rd party WPF control set will be used.  Many 3rd party companies provide WPF controls that are better and easier to use than those included by default.
    1. If you decided to use 3rd party controls, purchase or otherwise obtain the libraries for these 3rd party controls.
  3. Consider designing two WPF interfaces or skins (I will call these Views from here on out) for each screen. This will help drive the separation of the back end code from the WPF code. Also if developing two Views is not simple, it indicates a poor design.
  4. Design the interface(s) (you may be doing two Views) using SketchFlow (take time to include the libraries for the 3rd party WPF Controls in your SketchFlow project and design with them)
    1. SketchFlow allows you to design the UI, which is commonly done in paint, but instead does this in XAML, and is actually the WPF code your application will use.
  5. SketchFlow allows you to deliver the design (or both Views if you did two) as a package to the customer.
    1. Deliver it immediately and get feedback.
    2. Make changes suggested by the customer if in scope.
  6. Take time to make the XAML in SketchFlow production ready.
  7. Deliver the XAML to the customer again, to buy of that the design changes are proper.
    1. Make changes suggested by the customer if in scope.

Step 4 – Determine the delivery or install method

  1. Determine the delivery method.
  2. Determine when to develop the delivery method.
    1. The easier the application is, the longer you can wait to determine the installer or delivery method.
    2. The more complex the install or delivery method, the sooner this should be started.

Step 5 – Develop the business logic

  1. Develop the application designed in step 2.
  2. Get the application working without UI or silently. Note: Start the next step, Develop the UI, as soon as enough code is available here.

Step 6 – Add Bindings to the UI

  1. Start the UI project by copying the XAML from the SketchFlow document to your Visual Studio or Expression Blend project.
  2. Determine a method for setting the DataContext without linking the View to any ViewModel or Model dlls.
  3. Create a project for the ViewModel code and develop it to interact with the business logic using Binding.
  4. Remember to develop two Views for every UI screen as this will help, though not guarantee, that the the MVVM model was correctly used.

Step 7 – Develop the View Model

  1. You should now have a backend code and a View, and now you start creating the View Model.
  2. This should be in a separate dll than the View or ViewModel.
  3. The ViewModel should never link to the View but can link to Model and Business libraries, though you may consider interface-based design and only link to an interface library.
  4. Make sure to use the properties that the View is binding to.

Step 8 – Consider a other platforms

Macintosh

Macintosh owns a significant market share.  Determine if this application needs to run on Macintosh as well. Sure, since we are running C# your options are limited to either rewriting in objective C and Coca, or using Mono with a MonoMac UI.  I recommend the latter.

Note: It is critical that the UI and business logic are separated to really make this successful.

  1. Completely ignore the WPF design and have Macintosh users users assist the design team in designing the new UI.  Macintosh’s have a different feel, and trying to convert the same UI is a mistake.
  2. Create the MonoMac UI project.
  3. Create a project similar to the ViewModel project in Windows, to link the UI to the business logic.

BSD/Linux/Unix

BLU (BSD/Linux/Unix) doesn’t exactly own a significant market share. However, it is still important to determine if this application needs to run on on BLU as well. Sure, since we are running C# your options are limited to either rewriting in C++, or using Mono with a GTK# or Forms UI.

  1. Completely ignore the WPF and Macintosh designs and have Linux users assist the design team in designing the new UI. Linux have a different feel, and trying to convert the same UI is a mistake.
  2. Create the GTK# project.
  3. Create a project similar to the ViewModel project in Windows, to link the UI to the business logic.
  4. GTK# doesn’t support binding, but still keep the UI separate from the business logic as much as possible.
  5. Also, don’t develop for a single open source flavor, but use standard code that compiles and any BSD/Linux/Unix platform.

Mobile Platforms

  1. Do you need to have this app on IOS or Android or Windows Phone?
  2. Completely ignore the WPF and Macintosh and Linux designs and have Android or IOS users assist the design team in designing the new UI. Mobile platforms have a different feel, and trying to convert the same UI is impossible as the screens are much smaller.

Step 9 – Develop the delivery method

Again, you may need to do this way sooner if the application is complex.

  1. Develop the install or delivery method.
  2. If you decided to deploy to Macintosh or BLU you may have to develop separate install or delivery methods for those platforms as well.
  3. Remember to have a plan and a test for your first patch even if you have to mock a sample patch before you release.
  4. Remember to have a plan and a test for upgrading your application even if you have to mock a sample upgrade version before you release.

Step 10 – Deliver the finished Products

  1. Once finished, deliver this product.
  2. If you decided to create a Macintosh or BLU version, deliver them when ready as well.  It is OK and maybe preferred to deliver these at different times.

How to configure the WPF RadioButton’s circle bullet top aligned when there are multiple lines of text?

Today I had to solve a problem that appeared quite difficult, but turned out to not be so hard if I let Expression Blend do most the work and finish it up in the XAML. I ended up having to completely recreate the default template style and then modify it.

Note: This article could also be titled: How to change the default template style of a standard control?

I had a RadioButton with text that wraps and it wasn’t displaying exactly how my team wanted. Here is the XAML.

<Window x:Class="RadioButtonTopAligned.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <RadioButton GroupName="RadioButtonList">
            <Label>
                <AccessText TextWrapping="Wrap" Text="_This is a very long radio button control line of text that should wrap." MaxWidth="300"/>
            </Label>
        </RadioButton>
    </Grid>
</Window>

The problem is that the circle bullet is center aligned like this:

Notice how the circle bullet is aligned in between the two lines of text. I need it to be top aligned like this:

Notice how the circle bullet is aligned with the top line of text. I need to get WPF to do this.

From a Visual Studio 2010 point of view, there is no easy way to do this. At first I thought it would be a simple dependency property, but it isn’t. An quick internet search led me to realize that I have to pretty much re-style the whole RadioButton. This sounds really hard and in fact, in Visual Studio, without help, it would be really hard. You would have to have the code for the default template style for the RadioButton control memorized.

Here is an forum post I found from MSDN: How do I make a RadioButton’s Bullet align top

While the post is exactly what I was looking for and has an answer, I didn’t at first grasp the answer. I wasn’t sure what was going on until one of my co-workers, Shawn, who is more skilled in Expression Blend, showed me. Now that I understand, I want to make sure the next person who finds the same forum post on MSDN can understand even easier by writing this article and adding it to the forum post.

This is where Expression Blend comes in. If you don’t have Expression Blend, don’t worry, you can still get through this article as I will include the the default style code that Expression Blend created for me right here in my post.

In Expression Blend, this is what to do.

  1. Create a blank WPF project in Expression Blend.
  2. Add a RadioButton.
  3. Right-click on the RadioButton and choose Edit Template | Edit a Copy…
  4. Click OK on the Create Style Resource window.

Here is what happens to your XAML and you can do this to the XAML in you project manually if you don’t have Expression Blend.

  1. The following reference is added to the project: PresentationFramework.Aero
  2. The same is referenced in the XAML (See line 4 of the XAML below)
  3. The default RadioButton style is copied to your XAML under the Window.Resources element.  (See lines 10-48 in the XAML below)
  4. The RadioButton is assigned the style created. (See line 51 in the XAML below)
<Window
	xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
	xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
	xmlns:Microsoft_Windows_Themes="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Windows.Themes;assembly=PresentationFramework.Aero"
	x:Class="RadioButtonTopAligned_EB.MainWindow"
	x:Name="Window"
	Title="MainWindow"
	Width="640" Height="480">

	<Window.Resources>
		<SolidColorBrush x:Key="CheckBoxStroke" Color="#8E8F8F"/>
		<Style x:Key="CheckRadioFocusVisual">
			<Setter Property="Control.Template">
				<Setter.Value>
					<ControlTemplate>
						<Rectangle Margin="14,0,0,0" SnapsToDevicePixels="true" Stroke="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.ControlTextBrushKey}}" StrokeThickness="1" StrokeDashArray="1 2"/>
					</ControlTemplate>
				</Setter.Value>
			</Setter>
		</Style>
		<Style x:Key="RadioButtonStyle1" TargetType="{x:Type RadioButton}">
			<Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.ControlTextBrushKey}}"/>
			<Setter Property="Background" Value="#F4F4F4"/>
			<Setter Property="BorderBrush" Value="{StaticResource CheckBoxStroke}"/>
			<Setter Property="BorderThickness" Value="1"/>
			<Setter Property="Template">
				<Setter.Value>
					<ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type RadioButton}">
						<BulletDecorator Background="Transparent">
							<BulletDecorator.Bullet>
								<Microsoft_Windows_Themes:BulletChrome BorderBrush="{TemplateBinding BorderBrush}" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}" IsChecked="{TemplateBinding IsChecked}" IsRound="true" RenderMouseOver="{TemplateBinding IsMouseOver}" RenderPressed="{TemplateBinding IsPressed}"/>
							</BulletDecorator.Bullet>
							<ContentPresenter HorizontalAlignment="{TemplateBinding HorizontalContentAlignment}" Margin="{TemplateBinding Padding}" RecognizesAccessKey="True" VerticalAlignment="{TemplateBinding VerticalContentAlignment}"/>
						</BulletDecorator>
						<ControlTemplate.Triggers>
							<Trigger Property="HasContent" Value="true">
								<Setter Property="FocusVisualStyle" Value="{StaticResource CheckRadioFocusVisual}"/>
								<Setter Property="Padding" Value="4,0,0,0"/>
							</Trigger>
							<Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="false">
								<Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.GrayTextBrushKey}}"/>
							</Trigger>
						</ControlTemplate.Triggers>
					</ControlTemplate>
				</Setter.Value>
			</Setter>
		</Style>
	</Window.Resources>

	<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot">
		<RadioButton GroupName="RadioButtonList" Style="{DynamicResource RadioButtonStyle1}">
			<Label>
				<AccessText TextWrapping="Wrap" Text="_This is a very long radio button control line of text that should wrap." MaxWidth="300"/>
			</Label>
		</RadioButton>
	</Grid>
</Window>

Now we can edit the XAML. Below is the same XAML as above with the following edits:

  1. Inside the BulletDecorator.Bullet element on line 30, create a DockPanel around the BulletChrome element.
  2. The ControlPresenter is moved to be inside the DockPanel.
  3. Add the following XAML atrributes to the BulletChrome element:
    VerticalAlignment=”Top” Margin=”0,8,0,0″ Height=”{TemplateBinding FontSize}” Width=”{TemplateBinding FontSize}”

    Note: If you change the font of the text content in the RadioButton, you should change the Margin in the style as well. I haven’t figured out how to make it always match the top line without manually tweaking it when you change the font. Also, if you don’t want the BulletChrome element to be the same size as the font, you will have to tweak Width and Height too.

<Window
	xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
	xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
	xmlns:Microsoft_Windows_Themes="clr-namespace:Microsoft.Windows.Themes;assembly=PresentationFramework.Aero"
	x:Class="RadioButtonTopAligned_EB.MainWindow"
	x:Name="Window"
	Title="MainWindow"
	Width="640" Height="480">

	<Window.Resources>
		<SolidColorBrush x:Key="CheckBoxStroke" Color="#8E8F8F"/>
		<Style x:Key="CheckRadioFocusVisual">
			<Setter Property="Control.Template">
				<Setter.Value>
					<ControlTemplate>
						<Rectangle Margin="14,0,0,0" SnapsToDevicePixels="true" Stroke="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.ControlTextBrushKey}}" StrokeThickness="1" StrokeDashArray="1 2"/>
					</ControlTemplate>
				</Setter.Value>
			</Setter>
		</Style>
		<Style x:Key="RadioButtonStyle1" TargetType="{x:Type RadioButton}">
			<Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.ControlTextBrushKey}}"/>
			<Setter Property="Background" Value="#F4F4F4"/>
			<Setter Property="BorderBrush" Value="{StaticResource CheckBoxStroke}"/>
			<Setter Property="BorderThickness" Value="1"/>
			<Setter Property="Template">
				<Setter.Value>
					<ControlTemplate TargetType="{x:Type RadioButton}">
						<BulletDecorator Background="Transparent">
							<BulletDecorator.Bullet>
								<DockPanel>
									<Microsoft_Windows_Themes:BulletChrome VerticalAlignment="Top" Margin="0,8,0,0" Height="{TemplateBinding FontSize}" Width="{TemplateBinding FontSize}" BorderBrush="{TemplateBinding BorderBrush}" Background="{TemplateBinding Background}" IsChecked="{TemplateBinding IsChecked}" IsRound="true" RenderMouseOver="{TemplateBinding IsMouseOver}" RenderPressed="{TemplateBinding IsPressed}" />
									<ContentPresenter RecognizesAccessKey="True" VerticalAlignment="{TemplateBinding VerticalContentAlignment}"/>
								</DockPanel>
							</BulletDecorator.Bullet>
							</BulletDecorator>
						<ControlTemplate.Triggers>
							<Trigger Property="HasContent" Value="true">
								<Setter Property="FocusVisualStyle" Value="{StaticResource CheckRadioFocusVisual}"/>
								<Setter Property="Padding" Value="4,0,0,0"/>
							</Trigger>
							<Trigger Property="IsEnabled" Value="false">
								<Setter Property="Foreground" Value="{DynamicResource {x:Static SystemColors.GrayTextBrushKey}}"/>
							</Trigger>
						</ControlTemplate.Triggers>
					</ControlTemplate>
				</Setter.Value>
			</Setter>
		</Style>
	</Window.Resources>

	<Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot">
		<RadioButton GroupName="RadioButtonList" Style="{DynamicResource RadioButtonStyle1}">
			<Label>
				<AccessText TextWrapping="Wrap" Text="_This is a very long radio button control line of text that should wrap." MaxWidth="300"/>
			</Label>
		</RadioButton>
	</Grid>
</Window>

I hope this posts clarifies how to completely recreate a template style for a default control to modify something that at first doesn’t appear modifiable.

Installing the latest version of Mono on FreeBSD or How to install and use portshaker?

Mono is basically the .NET Framework on FreeBSD or other open source platforms. This allows development in C# on FreeBSD.  C# is an extremely popular language that is not slowing down.  It’s popularity stems from that fact that this language and its features allows for rapid development that is much faster than many other languages.

The version of Mono available in the ports tree is not the latest version available. Just like FreeBSD has a release version and a development version, Mono has a release version and a development version.  The development version is so much newer that it is hard not to recommend it over the release version.

Step 1 – Install the latest ports

This is already documented here:

How to install ports on FreeBSD?

Step 2 – Install portshaker and portshaker-config

The team at BSD# have a tool called portshaker that adds mono ports to the ports tree.  Install it as follows.

#
#
cd /usr/ports/ports-mgmt/portshaker-config
make BATCH=yes install

Note: Notice I didn’t just install portshaker, I installed portshaker-config which has portshaker as a dependency, so you get both installed with one command.

Step 3 – Configure portshaker

The example portshaker.conf.example is configured correctly for default configurations, so all we need to do is copy it.

# cp /usr/local/etc/portshaker.conf.example /usr/local/etc/portshaker.conf

Step 4 – Run portshaker

Yes, it is that easy.  Simply run portshaker.

# portshaker

Note: You may be prompted to merge a few files. I diffed and chose either install or continue each time.

Note: Running portshaker uses subversion to download so if you need to use an HTTP proxy, you have to configure subversion to use an HTTP proxy as it doesn’t use the FreeBSD HTTP_PROXY environment variable.

Your ports tree is now updated by portshaker.

Step 5 – Install mono

The mono port should now be updated to the latest version.

#
#
cd /usr/ports/lang/mono
make BATCH=yes install

Mono is now installed on your system.

There is an example of building a hello world app here:

C# (Mono) on FreeBSD

Visual Studo Power Tools

I just installed Visual Studio Power Tools.

Visual Studio Power Tools | MSDN

I will see if there are features that I actually use.

Binding Visibility to a bool value in WPF

Please go here for updates to this post:

Binding Visibility to a bool value in WPF

I was putting code in my ViewModel that returns Visibility but I didn’t really like that very much. If the UI is created with something other than WPF, that is really not going to work. Since I intend to do cross compile my code in Mono, which doesn’t have WPF but uses either Forms or GTK#, I have already encountered this issue. What I really want to use is bool.

The solution is IValueConverter. If you just want the code and don’t want to read this post, just scroll to the bottom and grab the

IValueConverter is part of PresentationFramework (in PresentationFramework.dll) so it isn’t available in Mono, but that is OK because you don’t instantiate it in the ViewModel, you use it in the View so it will only be used when the GUI is part of WPF. So if you are separating your View into a separate DLL, this would be included in the View DLL, that way when you compile everything else, with say a different GUI that uses GTK#, you won’t get a compiler error because PresentationFramework doesn’t exist in Mono.

BooleanToVisibilityConverter

Well, there is an object already created for you called BooleanToVisibilityConverter, but it is limited. True is converted Visibility.Visible. False is converted to Visibility.Collapsed.

Here we see a problem. Visibility has three possible values but a Boolean only has two.

BooleanVisibility
TrueVisible
FalseCollapsed
Hidden

This will cover many of the scenarios, but not all.

Here is how it would be used.

For this example, I have this Person class.

    public class Person
    {
        public Person() { }
        public String FirstName { get; set; }
        public String LastName { get; set; }
        public String Age { get; set; }
    }

Here is a simple View for this object. It has a Grid that has a Label and TextBox for each property in the Person object. It also has a CheckBox. The CheckBox gives us a easy bool value, IsChecked. This works similar to a bool property in a ViewModel.

<Window x:Class="TestBooleanToVisibilityConverter.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:TestBooleanToVisibilityConverter"
        Title="MainWindow"
        SizeToContent="WidthAndHeight"
        >
    <Grid Margin="20">
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <Grid Name="PersonViewGrid">
            <Grid.Resources>
                <BooleanToVisibilityConverter x:Key="BoolToVisConverter"/>
            </Grid.Resources>
            <Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
                <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto" />
                <ColumnDefinition Width="Auto" />
            </Grid.ColumnDefinitions>
            <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
                <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
                <RowDefinition Height="Auto" />
            </Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <Label Content="First Name:" Grid.Column="0" Grid.Row="0" />
            <TextBox Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="0" Name="firstNameTextBox"
                     Text="{Binding Path=FirstName, Mode=TwoWay, ValidatesOnExceptions=true, NotifyOnValidationError=true}" MinWidth="175" />
            <Label Content="Last Name:" Grid.Column="0" Grid.Row="1" />
            <TextBox Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="1" Name="lastNameTextBox"
                     Text="{Binding Path=LastName, Mode=TwoWay, ValidatesOnExceptions=true, NotifyOnValidationError=true}" MinWidth="175" />
            <Label Content="Age:" Grid.Column="0" Grid.Row="2"
                   Visibility="{Binding IsChecked, ElementName=ShowAgeCheckBox, Converter={StaticResource BoolToVisConverter}}"/>
            <TextBox Grid.Column="1" Grid.Row="2" Name="ageTextBox"
                     Text="{Binding Path=Age, Mode=TwoWay, ValidatesOnExceptions=true, NotifyOnValidationError=true}" MinWidth="175"
                   Visibility="{Binding IsChecked, ElementName=ShowAgeCheckBox, Converter={StaticResource BoolToVisConverter}}"/>
        </Grid>
        <Grid Grid.Row="1">
            <CheckBox Name="ShowAgeCheckBox" Content="Show Age" />
        </Grid>
    </Grid>
</Window>

I am not using MVVM for this example, but instead there is a just a single object created in the code behind for demo purposes.

using System;
using System.Windows;

namespace TestBooleanToVisibilityConverter
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
    /// </summary>
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent(); Person p = new Person() { FirstName = "Michael", LastName = "Michaels", Age = "33" };
            PersonViewGrid.DataContext = p;
        }

    }
}

Ok, now build the project and you will see that the Label and TextBox for Age are hidden until you check the box.

Writing your own Bool to Visibility Converter

Sometimes you may need to write you own Converter.  For example, in the above project, it is annoying how the CheckBox moves up and down in position because Visibility.Collapsed is used instead of Visibility.Hidden.  You may want to use Visibility.Hidden instead.

You can write your own Converter that returns Visibility.Hidden instead of Visibility.Collapsed.

BooleanToVisibleOrHidden.cs

using System;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows;

namespace TestBooleanToVisibilityConverter
{
    class BoolToVisibleOrHidden : IValueConverter
    {
        #region Constructors
        /// <summary>
        /// The default constructor
        /// </summary>
        public BoolToVisibleOrHidden() { }
        #endregion

        #region IValueConverter Members
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            bool bValue = (bool)value;
            if (bValue)
                return Visibility.Visible;
            else
                return Visibility.Hidden;
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            Visibility visibility = (Visibility)value;

            if (visibility == Visibility.Visible)
                return true;
            else
                return false;
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Here we do the conversion ourselves and now we have a different conversion table.

BooleanVisibility
TrueVisible
Collapsed
FalseHidden

Now replace the Converter object in your XAML.  We only change Line 15.

      <local:BoolToVisibleOrHidden x:Key="BoolToVisConverter"/>

This works, but it could be improved. This still leaves us having to choose between two objects.

Creating a Converter that supports a choice of Hidden or Collapsed.

Here we will provide a property that determines if we should collapse or not.

Add a property called Collapse and return the appropriate Visibility based on that property. Here is the new object. As you see, the code changes to add this feature is really just an empty bool property and an if statement that used the bool property.

using System;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows;

namespace TestBooleanToVisibilityConverter
{
    class BoolToVisibleOrHidden : IValueConverter
    {
        #region Constructors
        /// <summary>
        /// The default constructor
        /// </summary>
        public BoolToVisibleOrHidden() { }
        #endregion

        #region Properties
        public bool Collapse { get; set; }
        #endregion

        #region IValueConverter Members
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            bool bValue = (bool)value;
            if (bValue)
            {
                return Visibility.Visible;
            }
            else
            {
                if (Collapse)
                    return Visibility.Collapsed;
                else
                    return Visibility.Hidden;
            }
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            Visibility visibility = (Visibility)value;

            if (visibility == Visibility.Visible)
                return true;
            else
                return false;
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Now in your XAML you have the option to do nothing, which uses the bool default value false, or to set the Collapse property to true as shown below.

      <local:BoolToVisibleOrHidden x:Key="BoolToVisConverter" Collapse="True"/>

We now support either feature with the following table. We probably at this point would rename the object to BooleanToVisibilityConverter, but Microsoft already took that object name so I will leave it named as is.

BooleanVisibility
TrueVisible
False – Collapse=TrueCollapsed
False – Collapse=FalseHidden

We are starting to get a little more usability from one object.

Adding the Reverse feature so False is Visible and True is Collapsed or Hidden

Lets say we want to change the CheckBox so that instead of saying “Show Age” it says “Hide Age”.

            <CheckBox Name="ShowAgeCheckBox" Content="Hide Age" />

Now we have to reverse the mapping. If Reverse=”True” we want the mapping to be like this:

BooleanVisibility
FalseVisible
True – Collapse=TrueCollapsed
True – Collapse=FalseHidden

This is also quite simple. We add another bool property called Reverse. Then key of that in another if statement.

using System;
using System.Windows.Data;
using System.Windows;

namespace TestBooleanToVisibilityConverter
{
    class BoolToVisibleOrHidden : IValueConverter
    {
        #region Constructors
        /// <summary>
        /// The default constructor
        /// </summary>
        public BoolToVisibleOrHidden() { }
        #endregion

        #region Properties
        public bool Collapse { get; set; }
        public bool Reverse { get; set; }
        #endregion

        #region IValueConverter Members
        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            bool bValue = (bool)value;

                if (bValue != Reverse)
                {
                    return Visibility.Visible;
                }
                else
                {
                    if (Collapse)
                        return Visibility.Collapsed;
                    else
                        return Visibility.Hidden;
                }
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)
        {
            Visibility visibility = (Visibility)value;

                if (visibility == Visibility.Visible)
                    return !Reverse;
                else
                    return Reverse;
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Now you can reverse this very easily in the XAML.

      <local:BoolToVisibleOrHidden x:Key="BoolToVisConverter" Collapse="True" Reverse="True" />

And now you have a much more full featured converter.

Additional Thoughts

I have to wonder why the developers didn’t do this originally with the BooleanToVisibilityConverter object. It is so simple. This is a perfect example of where Microsoft would benefit from Open Sourcing some of their code. A dozen people would have contributed this change by now if they had and all Microsoft would have to do is look at the submitted code, approve, and check it in.

How to read the 64 bit registry from a 32 bit application or vice versa

I found out that I needed to read the 64 bit registry from a 32 bit app today.

Why you might ask?

Well, I need to get the RegisteredOrganization value from HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion and unfortunately Microsoft has a bug where the WOW6432 version of this key always says Microsoft, so a 32 bit application would always return Microsoft as the RegisteredOrganization, regardless of what the user entered when they installed the OS. This is hardly desired.

Note: This is also why all Visual Studio projects created in Windows 7 64 bit have Microsoft in the project’s Assembly Information. Change the WOW6432 version of the RegisteredOrganization and you fix this Visual Studio issue.
Well, turns out C# doesn’t have functionality until .NET 4, so prior to .NET 4, to choose the 64 bit hive when running a 32 bit app, so we have to do use a DLLImport and use RegOpenKeyEx, RegCloseKey, and RegQueryValueEx.

I don’t have this well commented, and it is not very newbie proof, but here are three different ways to do this. Hopefully you can understand one or more of these.

Example 1 – .NET 4 Example

Here is how to do this in .NET 4.

using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace Read64bitRegistryFrom32bitApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string value64 = string.Empty;
            string value32 = string.Empty;

            RegistryKey localKey = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(Microsoft.Win32.RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry64);
            localKey = localKey.OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion");
            if (localKey != null)
            {
                value64 = localKey.GetValue("RegisteredOrganization").ToString();
            }
            RegistryKey localKey32 = RegistryKey.OpenBaseKey(Microsoft.Win32.RegistryHive.LocalMachine, RegistryView.Registry32);
            localKey32 = localKey32.OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion");
            if (localKey32 != null)
            {
                value32 = localKey32.GetValue("RegisteredOrganization").ToString();
            }
        }
    }
}

.NET 3.5 SP1 and Prior

This can also be done in .NET 3.5 and prior but it is not easy.
We have to do use a DLLImport and use RegOpenKeyEx, RegCloseKey, and RegQueryValueEx. Here are some examples.

Example 1 – A console application to read the 64 bit registry from a 32 bit application or vice versa

Here is the code in a simple one file project:
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;

namespace Read64bitRegistryFrom32bitApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string value64 = GetRegKey64(RegHive.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion", "RegisteredOrganization");
            Console.WriteLine(value64);
            string value32 = GetRegKey32(RegHive.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion", "RegisteredOrganization");
            Console.WriteLine(value32);
        }

        public enum RegSAM
        {
            QueryValue = 0x0001,
            SetValue = 0x0002,
            CreateSubKey = 0x0004,
            EnumerateSubKeys = 0x0008,
            Notify = 0x0010,
            CreateLink = 0x0020,
            WOW64_32Key = 0x0200,
            WOW64_64Key = 0x0100,
            WOW64_Res = 0x0300,
            Read = 0x00020019,
            Write = 0x00020006,
            Execute = 0x00020019,
            AllAccess = 0x000f003f
        }

        public static UIntPtr HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = new UIntPtr(0x80000002u);
        public static UIntPtr HKEY_CURRENT_USER = new UIntPtr(0x80000001u);

        #region Member Variables
        #region Read 64bit Reg from 32bit app
        [DllImport("Advapi32.dll")]
        static extern uint RegOpenKeyEx(
            UIntPtr hKey,
            string lpSubKey,
            uint ulOptions,
            int samDesired,
            out int phkResult);

        [DllImport("Advapi32.dll")]
        static extern uint RegCloseKey(int hKey);

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", EntryPoint = "RegQueryValueEx")]
        public static extern int RegQueryValueEx(
            int hKey, string lpValueName,
            int lpReserved,
            ref uint lpType,
            System.Text.StringBuilder lpData,
            ref uint lpcbData);
        #endregion
        #endregion

        #region Functions
        static public string GetRegKey64(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, String inPropertyName)
        {
            return GetRegKey64(inHive, inKeyName, RegSAM.WOW64_64Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        static public string GetRegKey32(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, String inPropertyName)
        {
            return GetRegKey64(inHive, inKeyName, RegSAM.WOW64_32Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        static public string GetRegKey64(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, RegSAM in32or64key, String inPropertyName)
        {
            //UIntPtr HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = (UIntPtr)0x80000002;
            int hkey = 0;

            try
            {
                uint lResult = RegOpenKeyEx(RegHive.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, inKeyName, 0, (int)RegSAM.QueryValue | (int)in32or64key, out hkey);
                if (0 != lResult) return null;
                uint lpType = 0;
                uint lpcbData = 1024;
                StringBuilder AgeBuffer = new StringBuilder(1024);
                RegQueryValueEx(hkey, inPropertyName, 0, ref lpType, AgeBuffer, ref lpcbData);
                string Age = AgeBuffer.ToString();
                return Age;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (0 != hkey) RegCloseKey(hkey);
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Example 2 – A static class to read the 64 bit registry from a 32 bit application or vice versa

Or if you want this in its own separate class, here is a static class you can add to your project.
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;

namespace Read64bitRegistryFrom32bitApp
{
    public enum RegSAM
    {
        QueryValue = 0x0001,
        SetValue = 0x0002,
        CreateSubKey = 0x0004,
        EnumerateSubKeys = 0x0008,
        Notify = 0x0010,
        CreateLink = 0x0020,
        WOW64_32Key = 0x0200,
        WOW64_64Key = 0x0100,
        WOW64_Res = 0x0300,
        Read = 0x00020019,
        Write = 0x00020006,
        Execute = 0x00020019,
        AllAccess = 0x000f003f
    }

    public static class RegHive
    {
        public static UIntPtr HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = new UIntPtr(0x80000002u);
        public static UIntPtr HKEY_CURRENT_USER = new UIntPtr(0x80000001u);
    }

    public static class RegistryWOW6432
    {
        #region Member Variables
        #region Read 64bit Reg from 32bit app
        [DllImport("Advapi32.dll")]
        static extern uint RegOpenKeyEx(
            UIntPtr hKey,
            string lpSubKey,
            uint ulOptions,
            int samDesired,
            out int phkResult);

        [DllImport("Advapi32.dll")]
        static extern uint RegCloseKey(int hKey);

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", EntryPoint = "RegQueryValueEx")]
        public static extern int RegQueryValueEx(
            int hKey, string lpValueName,
            int lpReserved,
            ref uint lpType,
            System.Text.StringBuilder lpData,
            ref uint lpcbData);
        #endregion
        #endregion

        #region Functions
        static public string GetRegKey64(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, String inPropertyName)
        {
            return GetRegKey64(inHive, inKeyName, RegSAM.WOW64_64Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        static public string GetRegKey32(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, String inPropertyName)
        {
            return GetRegKey64(inHive, inKeyName, RegSAM.WOW64_32Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        static public string GetRegKey64(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, RegSAM in32or64key, String inPropertyName)
        {
            //UIntPtr HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = (UIntPtr)0x80000002;
            int hkey = 0;

            try
            {
                uint lResult = RegOpenKeyEx(RegHive.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, inKeyName, 0, (int)RegSAM.QueryValue | (int)in32or64key, out hkey);
                if (0 != lResult) return null;
                uint lpType = 0;
                uint lpcbData = 1024;
                StringBuilder AgeBuffer = new StringBuilder(1024);
                RegQueryValueEx(hkey, inPropertyName, 0, ref lpType, AgeBuffer, ref lpcbData);
                string Age = AgeBuffer.ToString();
                return Age;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (0 != hkey) RegCloseKey(hkey);
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Enums
        #endregion
    }
}
Here is an example of using this class.
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;

namespace Read64bitRegistryFrom32bitApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string value64 = RegistryWOW6432.GetRegKey64(RegHive.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion", "RegisteredOrganization");
            string value32 = RegistryWOW6432.GetRegKey32(RegHive.HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE, @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion", "RegisteredOrganization");
        }
    }
}

Example 3 – Adding extension methods to the managed RegistryKey object that read the 64 bit registry from a 32 bit application or vice versa

You know what else is a cool idea? Making it an extension class to the normal managed registry C# code. So you can create a regular managed RegistryKey and then just call an extension function off it.
using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Text;
using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace Read64bitRegistryFrom32bitApp
{
    /// <summary>
    /// An extension class to allow a registry key to allow it to get the
    /// registry in the 32 bit (Wow6432Node) or 64 bit regular registry key
    /// </summary>
    public static class RegistryWOW6432
    {
        #region Member Variables
        #region Read 64bit Reg from 32bit app
        public static UIntPtr HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = new UIntPtr(0x80000002u);
        public static UIntPtr HKEY_CURRENT_USER = new UIntPtr(0x80000001u);

        [DllImport("Advapi32.dll")]
        static extern uint RegOpenKeyEx(
            UIntPtr hKey,
            string lpSubKey,
            uint ulOptions,
            int samDesired,
            out int phkResult);

        [DllImport("Advapi32.dll")]
        static extern uint RegCloseKey(int hKey);

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", EntryPoint = "RegQueryValueEx")]
        public static extern int RegQueryValueEx(
            int hKey, 
            string lpValueName,
            int lpReserved,
            ref RegistryValueKind lpType,
            StringBuilder lpData,
            ref uint lpcbData);

        [DllImport("advapi32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode, EntryPoint = "RegQueryValueEx")]
        private static extern int RegQueryValueEx(
            int hKey,
            string lpValueName,
            int lpReserved,
            ref RegistryValueKind lpType,
            [Out] byte[] lpData,
            ref uint lpcbData);
        #endregion
        #endregion

        #region Functions
        public static string GetRegKey64(this RegistryKey inKey, String inPropertyName)
        {
            string strKey = inKey.ToString();
            string regHive = strKey.Split('\\')[0];
            string regPath = strKey.Substring(strKey.IndexOf('\\') + 1);
            return GetRegKey64(GetRegHiveFromString(regHive), regPath, RegSAM.WOW64_64Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        public static string GetRegKey32(this RegistryKey inKey, String inPropertyName)
        {
            string strKey = inKey.ToString();
            string regHive = strKey.Split('\\')[0];
            string regPath = strKey.Substring(strKey.IndexOf('\\') + 1);
            return GetRegKey64(GetRegHiveFromString(regHive), regPath, RegSAM.WOW64_32Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        public static byte[] GetRegKey64AsByteArray(this RegistryKey inKey, String inPropertyName)
        {
            string strKey = inKey.ToString();
            string regHive = strKey.Split('\\')[0];
            string regPath = strKey.Substring(strKey.IndexOf('\\') + 1);
            return GetRegKey64AsByteArray(GetRegHiveFromString(regHive), regPath, RegSAM.WOW64_64Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        public static byte[] GetRegKey32AsByteArray(this RegistryKey inKey, String inPropertyName)
        {
            string strKey = inKey.ToString();
            string regHive = strKey.Split('\\')[0];
            string regPath = strKey.Substring(strKey.IndexOf('\\') + 1);
            return GetRegKey64AsByteArray(GetRegHiveFromString(regHive), regPath, RegSAM.WOW64_32Key, inPropertyName);
        }

        private static UIntPtr GetRegHiveFromString(string inString)
        {
            if (inString == "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE")
                return HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE;
            if (inString == "HKEY_CURRENT_USER")
                return HKEY_CURRENT_USER;
            return UIntPtr.Zero;
        }

        static public string GetRegKey64(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, RegSAM in32or64key, String inPropertyName)
        {
            //UIntPtr HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE = (UIntPtr)0x80000002;
            int hkey = 0;

            try
            {
                uint lResult = RegOpenKeyEx(inHive, inKeyName, 0, (int)RegSAM.QueryValue | (int)in32or64key, out hkey);
                if (0 != lResult) return null;
                RegistryValueKind lpType = 0;
                uint lpcbData = 1024;
                StringBuilder strBuffer = new StringBuilder(1024);
                RegQueryValueEx(hkey, inPropertyName, 0, ref lpType, strBuffer, ref lpcbData);
                string value = strBuffer.ToString();
                return value;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (0 != hkey) RegCloseKey(hkey);
            }
        }

        static public byte[] GetRegKey64AsByteArray(UIntPtr inHive, String inKeyName, RegSAM in32or64key, String inPropertyName)
        {
            int hkey = 0;

            try
            {
                uint lResult = RegOpenKeyEx(inHive, inKeyName, 0, (int)RegSAM.QueryValue | (int)in32or64key, out hkey);
                if (0 != lResult) return null;
                RegistryValueKind lpType = 0;
                uint lpcbData = 2048;

                // Just make a big buffer the first time
                byte[] byteBuffer = new byte[1000];
                // The first time, get the real size
                RegQueryValueEx(hkey, inPropertyName, 0, ref lpType, byteBuffer, ref lpcbData);
                // Now create a correctly sized buffer
                byteBuffer = new byte[lpcbData];
                // now get the real value
                RegQueryValueEx(hkey, inPropertyName, 0, ref lpType, byteBuffer, ref lpcbData);

                return byteBuffer;
            }
            finally
            {
                if (0 != hkey) RegCloseKey(hkey);
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Enums
        public enum RegSAM
        {
            QueryValue = 0x0001,
            SetValue = 0x0002,
            CreateSubKey = 0x0004,
            EnumerateSubKeys = 0x0008,
            Notify = 0x0010,
            CreateLink = 0x0020,
            WOW64_32Key = 0x0200,
            WOW64_64Key = 0x0100,
            WOW64_Res = 0x0300,
            Read = 0x00020019,
            Write = 0x00020006,
            Execute = 0x00020019,
            AllAccess = 0x000f003f
        }
        #endregion
    }
}
Here is an example of using these extension functions.
using Microsoft.Win32;

namespace Read64bitRegistryFrom32bitApp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string value64 = string.Empty;
            string value32 = string.Empty;

            byte[] byteValue64 = new byte[1024];
            byte[] byteValue32 = new byte[1024];
            RegistryKey localKey = Registry.LocalMachine;
            
            localKey = localKey.OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion");
            if (localKey != null)
            {
                value32 = localKey.GetRegKey32("RegisteredOrganization");
                value64 = localKey.GetRegKey64("RegisteredOrganization");

                // byteValue32 = localKey.GetRegKey32AsByteArray("DigitalProductId"); // Key doesn't exist by default in 32 bit
                byteValue64 = localKey.GetRegKey64AsByteArray("DigitalProductId");
            }
        }
    }
}
If anything is confusing please comment.
Resources:
  • RegOpenKeyEx Function – http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724897%28v=VS.85%29.aspx
  • RegQueryValueEx Function – http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms724911%28VS.85%29.aspx
  • http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/advapi32/RegQueryValueEx.html
  • http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/advapi32/RegOpenKeyEx.html
  • http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/advapi32/RegCreateKeyEx.html
  • http://www.pinvoke.net/default.aspx/advapi32/RegCloseKey.html
  • http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1470770/accessing-registry-using-net
  • http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/400597/registeredorganization-reg-key-on-x64-vista-7

Copyright ® Rhyous.com – Linking to this post is allowed without permission and as many as ten lines of this page can be used along with this link. Any other use of this page is allowed only by permission of Rhyous.com.

C# (Mono) – Reading and writing to a text file

C# (Mono) on FreeBSD
File access is made simple with C# (Mono) on FreeBSD.

Reading a text file with C# (Mono)

To read a file, use a StreamReader object. However, it is easy if you don’t do a new StreamWriter("File.txt") but instead use File.OpenText("File.txt") to create the StreamReader. Once you have the stream, you just need to run the stream’s ReadToEnd() function.

Here is a snippet to read a text file as a string.

// Open the file into a StreamReader
StreamReader file = File.OpenText("SomeFile.txt");
// Read the file into a string
string s = file.ReadToEnd();

Now that you have the text file as a string, you can manipulate the string as you desire.

Writing to a text file with C# (Mono)

To write a text file, use StreamWriter.

string str = "Some text";
// Hook a write to the text file.
StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter("SomeFile.txt");
// Rewrite the entire value of s to the file
writer.Write(str);

You can also just add a line to the end of the file as follows:

string str = "Some text";
// Hook a write to the text file.
StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter("SomeFile.txt");
// Rewrite the entire value of s to the file
writer.WriteLine(str);

Example for learning

An example of these in a little project file made with MonoDevelop.

using System;
using System.IO;

namespace FileAccess
{
	class MainClass
	{
		public static void Main (string[] args)
		{
			string FileName="TestFile.txt";

			// Open the file into a StreamReader
			StreamReader file = File.OpenText(FileName);
			// Read the file into a string
			string s = file.ReadToEnd();
			// Close the file so it can be accessed again.
			file.Close();

			// Add a line to the text
			s  += "A new line.\n";

			// Hook a write to the text file.
			StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(FileName);
			// Rewrite the entire value of s to the file
			writer.Write(s);

			// Add a single line
			writer.WriteLine("Add a single line.");

			// Close the writer
			writer.Close();
		}
	}
}

Well, this should get you started.

A Visual Studio snippet for a class with #region sections

Here is a simple snippet to add to Visual Studio if you want:

Place it here for Visual Studio 2010: C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC#\Snippets\1033\Visual C#

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<CodeSnippets  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
	<CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
		<Header>
			<Title>classr</Title>
			<Shortcut>classr</Shortcut>
			<Description>Code snippet for class with prepopulated regions.</Description>
			<Author>Microsoft Corporation</Author>
			<SnippetTypes>
				<SnippetType>Expansion</SnippetType>
				<SnippetType>SurroundsWith</SnippetType>
			</SnippetTypes>
		</Header>
		<Snippet>
			<Declarations>
				<Literal>
					<ID>name</ID>
					<ToolTip>Class name</ToolTip>
					<Default>MyClass</Default>
				</Literal>
			</Declarations>
			<Code Language="csharp"><!&#91;CDATA&#91;class $name$
	{
	#region Member Fields
	#endregion
	
	#region Constructor
	/// <summary>
	/// The default constructor
	/// </summary>
	public $name$()
	{
	}
	#endregion
	
	#region Properties
	#endregion
	
	#region Functions
	#endregion
	
	#region enums
	#endregion
		$selected$$end$
	}&#93;&#93;>
			</Code>
		</Snippet>
	</CodeSnippet>
</CodeSnippets>

A Progress Bar using WPF’s ProgressBar Control, BackgroundWorker, and MVVM

WPF provides a ProgressBar control.  But there isn’t really a manual for it, especially if you want to follow MVVM.

So I am going to make a little application that counts from zero to ten and tracks the progress.  You are going to see when it is OK to use the foreground and when it is not OK but better to use BackgroundWorker.

While much of this code may be production ready, you should be aware that this code intentionally implements a foreground process that is an example of what not to do.

Prerequisites

  • Visual Studio

Step 1 – Create a new WPF Application Project

  1. In Visual Studio, create a new Solution and choose WPF Application
  2. Give it a name.
  3. Hit OK.

Step 2 – Add two base MVVM files

There are two basic classes used for MVVM.

  • RelayCommand
  • ViewModelBase

These are found on different blogs and different posts all over the internet, so I would say they are public domain, or free and unlicensed.

  1. Download them zipped here. MVVM
  2. Extract the zip file.
  3. Add the MVVM folder and the two class under it to your project.

Step 3 – Create a ProgressBarViewModel class

  1. Create a new Class called ProgressBarViewModel.
  2. Adding a using MVVM statement at the top.
  3. Make the class inherit ViewModelBase.
    class ProgressBarViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
    }
    

This will be populated as we create our View.

Step 4 – Design the GUI in MainWindow.xaml

Ok, so lets create the GUI.

  1. Add a local reference. (Line 4)
  2. Add a ProgressBarViewModel object as a resource. (Lines 6-8)
  3. Create a StackPanel in the default Grid to put everything in. (Line 10)
  4. Add a one character label in great big text to display our number. (Line 11)
  5. Add a ProgressBar element. (Line 12)
  6. Create buttons to manipulate the label. (Lines 13-16)
  7. Configure the DataContext of each element to be the the ProgressBarViewModel using the Key PBVM we gave it when we added it as a resource. (Lines 11-16)
  8. Think of and create Binding Paths for each element. Yes, we can basically just make these Path names up and add them to the ProgressBarViewModel later. (Lines 11-16)

Here is the XAML.

<Window x:Class=&quot;WPFProgressBarUsingBackgroundWorker.MainWindow&quot;
        xmlns=&quot;http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation&quot;
        xmlns:x=&quot;http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml&quot;
        xmlns:local=&quot;clr-namespace:WPFProgressBarUsingBackgroundWorker&quot;
        Title=&quot;MainWindow&quot; >
    <Window.Resources>
        <local:ProgressBarViewModel x:Key=&quot;PBVM&quot; />
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid>
        <StackPanel>
            <Label Content=&quot;{Binding Path=Value}&quot; DataContext=&quot;{StaticResource ResourceKey=PBVM}&quot; HorizontalAlignment=&quot;Stretch&quot; HorizontalContentAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; Name=&quot;labelNumberCounter&quot; VerticalAlignment=&quot;Center&quot; FontSize=&quot;175&quot; />
            <ProgressBar Margin=&quot;0,3,0,3&quot; Height=&quot;20&quot; Name=&quot;progressBar&quot; Value=&quot;{Binding Path=Value}&quot; DataContext=&quot;{StaticResource ResourceKey=PBVM}&quot; Minimum=&quot;{Binding Min}&quot; Maximum=&quot;{Binding Max}&quot;/>
            <Button Command=&quot;{Binding Path=IncrementBy1}&quot; Content=&quot;Manual Count&quot; DataContext=&quot;{StaticResource PBVM}&quot; Height=&quot;23&quot; IsEnabled=&quot;{Binding Path=IsNotInProgress}&quot; Name=&quot;button1&quot; Width=&quot;Auto&quot; />
            <Button Margin=&quot;0,3,0,3&quot; IsEnabled=&quot;{Binding Path=IsNotInProgress}&quot; Command=&quot;{Binding Path=IncrementAsForegroundProcess}&quot; DataContext=&quot;{StaticResource ResourceKey=PBVM}&quot; Content=&quot;Count to 10 as a foreground process&quot; HorizontalAlignment=&quot;Stretch&quot; Height=&quot;23&quot; Name=&quot;buttonForeground&quot; VerticalAlignment=&quot;Top&quot; Width=&quot;Auto&quot; />
            <Button Margin=&quot;0,3,0,3&quot; IsEnabled=&quot;{Binding Path=IsNotInProgress}&quot; Command=&quot;{Binding Path=IncrementAsBackgroundProcess}&quot; DataContext=&quot;{StaticResource ResourceKey=PBVM}&quot; Content=&quot;Count to 10 as a background process&quot; HorizontalAlignment=&quot;Stretch&quot; Height=&quot;23&quot; Name=&quot;buttonBackground&quot; VerticalAlignment=&quot;Top&quot; Width=&quot;Auto&quot; />
            <Button Command=&quot;{Binding Path=ResetCounter}&quot; Content=&quot;Reset&quot; DataContext=&quot;{StaticResource PBVM}&quot; Height=&quot;23&quot; IsEnabled=&quot;{Binding Path=IsNotInProgress}&quot; Name=&quot;buttonReset&quot; Width=&quot;Auto&quot; />
        </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Step 5 – Populate the ProgressBarViewModel

  1. Create the following member fields.
    • Double _Value;
    • bool _IsInProgress;
    • int _Min = 0;
    • int _Max = 10;
  2. Create a matching property for each member field. Make sure that in the set function of the property you call NotifyPropertyChanged(“PropertyName”).
  3. Create a function for each of the four buttons and populate these functions with the code. See the functions in the code below:
    • Increment()
    • IncrementProgressForeground()
    • IncrementProgressBackgroundWorker()
    • Reset()
  4. Create and populate the functions for the BackgroundWorker.
    • worker_DoWork
    • worker_RunWorkerCompleted()
  5. Create the following RelayCommand instances as member Fields.
    • RelayCommand _Increment;
    • RelayCommand _IncrementBy1;
    • RelayCommand _IncrementAsBackgroundProcess;
    • RelayCommand _ResetCounter;
  6. Create matching ICommand properties for each RelayCommand, instantiating the RelayCommand with the correct function.

Here is the code for the ProgressBarViewModel.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Threading;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Input;
using MVVM;

namespace WPFProgressBarUsingBackgroundWorker
{
    class ProgressBarViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
        #region Member Fields
        Double _Value;
        bool _IsInProgress;
        int _Min = 0, _Max = 10;
        #endregion

        #region Member RelayCommands that implement ICommand
        RelayCommand _Increment;
        RelayCommand _IncrementBy1;
        RelayCommand _IncrementAsBackgroundProcess;
        RelayCommand _ResetCounter;
        #endregion

        #region Constructors
        /// <summary>
        /// The default constructor
        /// </summary>
        public ProgressBarViewModel()
        {
        }
        #endregion

        #region Properties
        /// <summary>
        /// Used to mark if the counter is in progress so the counter can't be started
        /// while it is already running.
        /// </summary>
        public bool IsInProgress
        {
            get { return _IsInProgress; }
            set
            {
                _IsInProgress = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged(&quot;IsInProgress&quot;);
                NotifyPropertyChanged(&quot;IsNotInProgress&quot;);
            }
        }

        public bool IsNotInProgress
        {
            get { return !IsInProgress; }
        }

        public int Max
        {
            get { return _Max; }
            set { _Max = value; NotifyPropertyChanged(&quot;Max&quot;); }
        }

        public int Min
        {
            get { return _Min; }
            set { _Min = value; NotifyPropertyChanged(&quot;Min&quot;); }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This is the Value.  The Counter should display this.
        /// </summary>
        public Double Value
        {
            get { return _Value; }
            set
            {
                if (value <= _Max)
                {
                    if (value >= _Min) { _Value = value; }
                    else { _Value = _Min; }
                }
                else { _Value = _Max; }
                NotifyPropertyChanged(&quot;Value&quot;);
            }
        }

        #region ICommand Properties
        /// <summary>
        /// An ICommand representation of the Increment() function.
        /// </summary>
        public ICommand IncrementBy1
        {
            get
            {
                if (_IncrementBy1 == null)
                {
                    _IncrementBy1 = new RelayCommand(param => this.Increment());
                }
                return _IncrementBy1;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// An ICommand representation of the IncrementProgressForegroundWorker() function.
        /// </summary>
        public ICommand IncrementAsForegroundProcess
        {
            get
            {
                if (_Increment == null)
                {
                    _Increment = new RelayCommand(param => this.IncrementProgressForeground());
                }
                return _Increment;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// An ICommand representation of the IncrementProgressForeground() function.
        /// </summary>
        public ICommand IncrementAsBackgroundProcess
        {
            get
            {
                if (_IncrementAsBackgroundProcess == null)
                {
                    _IncrementAsBackgroundProcess = new RelayCommand(param => this.IncrementProgressBackgroundWorker());
                }
                return _IncrementAsBackgroundProcess;
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// An ICommand representation of the Reset() function.
        /// </summary>
        public ICommand ResetCounter
        {
            get
            {
                if (_ResetCounter == null)
                {
                    _ResetCounter = new RelayCommand(param => this.Reset());
                }
                return _ResetCounter;
            }
        }
        #endregion ICommand Properties
        #endregion

        #region Functions
        /// <summary>
        /// This function manually increments the counter by 1 in the foreground.
        /// Because it only increments by one, the WPF control bound to Value will
        /// display the new value when this function completes.
        /// </summary>
        public void Increment()
        {
            // If we are in progress already, don't do anything
            if (IsInProgress)
                return;

            // If the value is already at 10, start the counting over.
            if (Value == 10)
                Reset();
            Value++;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This function starts the counter as a foreground process.
        /// This doesn't work.  It counts to 10 but the UI is not updated
        /// until the function completes.  This is especially problematic
        /// since the buttons are left enabled.
        /// </summary>
        public void IncrementProgressForeground()
        {
            // If we are in progress already, don't do anything
            if (IsInProgress)
                return;
            Reset();
            IsInProgress = true;
            Value = 0;
            for (int i = _Min; i < _Max; i++)
            {
                Value++;
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
            }
            IsInProgress = false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This starts the counter as a background process.
        /// </summary>
        public void IncrementProgressBackgroundWorker()
        {
            // If we are in progress already, don't do anything
            if (IsInProgress)
                return;

            Reset();
            IsInProgress = true;
            BackgroundWorker worker = new BackgroundWorker();
            // Configure the function that will run when started
            worker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(worker_DoWork);

            /*The progress reporting is not needed with this implementation and is therefore
            commented out.  However, in your more complex application, you may have a use for
            for this.

            //Enable progress and configure the progress function
            worker.WorkerReportsProgress = true;
            worker.ProgressChanged += new ProgressChangedEventHandler(worker_ProgressChanged);

            */

            // Configure the function to run when completed
            worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(worker_RunWorkerCompleted);

            // Launch the worker
            worker.RunWorkerAsync();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This is the function that is called when the worker is launched with the RunWorkerAsync() call.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name=&quot;sender&quot;>The worker as Object, but it can be cast to a worker.</param>
        /// <param name=&quot;e&quot;>The DoWorkEventArgs object.</param>
        void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
        {
            BackgroundWorker worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;
            for (int i = _Min; i < _Max; i++)
            {
                Value++;
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This worker_ProgressChanged function is not in use for this project. Thanks to INotifyPropertyChanged, this is
        /// completely unnecessary.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name=&quot;sender&quot;>The worker as Object, but it can be cast to a worker.</param>
        /// <param name=&quot;e&quot;>The ProgressChangedEventArgs object.</param>
        void worker_ProgressChanged(object sender, ProgressChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            // Does nothing yet
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This worker_RunWorkerCompleted is called when the worker is finished.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name=&quot;sender&quot;>The worker as Object, but it can be cast to a worker.</param>
        /// <param name=&quot;e&quot;>The RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs object.</param>
        void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            IsInProgress = false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This function resets the Value of the counter to 0.
        /// </summary>
        private void Reset()
        {
            Value = Min;
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

I’m sorry that this is not the most Newbie proof post. But I tried to comment like crazy the code so you can get through it.

Now if you find a discrepancy in my walk-through, please comment. Also, if it is easier for you to just download the project, here it is:
WPFProgressBarUsingBackgroundWorker.zip

Russian Government going Open Source…and the future

Well, I have seen governments claim they are going to open source before, but not from Russia, and not with such a realistic plan to migrate over a few years.

Here is a link to the article via Google translate:

Putin ordered the transfer of power on Linux

The now

Business drives software development.  Open Source communities help, but even today much of the ongoing development for Linux is driven by businesses such as Red Hat and Novell and others.  If you think your Linux code is being written by unpaid developers in their spare time, you are somewhat correct but only partially.  Most changes are made by developers who are paid.

While communities are nice, they can’t match the hours or output of experienced developers working forty to sixty hours a week.

Looking Ahead…the Apps…and C# (Mono)

The more open source is used in business, the more development power it will have.  But it is not the open source Operatings Systems that prevent people from moving to Linux or BSD.  Ubuntu, SUSE, Fedora, CentOS, PC-BSD, and numerous others are all very usable desktops that are user friendly.  It is the software that runs on them that everyone is waiting for.

The market is already there to make millions extra if you application runs cross platform, one Windows, MAC, Linux, and BSD.

But most the applications written for Windows, the business desktop of today, are using .NET Framework. So naturally those companies are going to want to make their code cross platform.  And they are going to find it is easier than they thought to move their applications between platforms using C#.  I have recently decided that C# is the future of applications on all platforms.

Some MAC and Linux users don’t like Microsoft and will fight off the idea of a Microsoft provided development platform such as C# (Mono) on their systems.  But when a corporation decides that you must run software X, and software X requires .NET, and you have to either give up your MAC or Linux box for a Windows box, or use C# (Mono), then users will come around.

If you are a company writing software for Windows only today and using C#, you need to take a look at Mono. Even if the return on investment of developing a C# (Mono) based version of your product is a slight loss to break even, it is an investment in the future.  Once written, maintenance costs will be less than the original development costs and that slight loss to break even margin will turn to a small profit.  And with the experience, you next app will migrate to C# (Mono) that much easier and soon, all you apps will run anywhere that C# (Mono) can run.

This is going to take off in a way Java hasn’t because developers for windows prefer and will continue to prefer .NET over Java.  And when it comes to business apps, Java just isn’t the language of choice.  Business applications are written in C#.

VMWare, RDP (MSTSC), WPF, and DisableHWAcceleration

I don’t know if you, like me, have a development box running Visual Studio 2010 and VMWare workstation. I develop in C# and WPF, and test the product in a VM. Then sometimes, when I work from home, I remote desktop into my development box.

When I am using RDP to remote control a VMWare Workstation host, and I run a WPF Application inside a VM, the WPF application doesn’t display. The window opens, and you see the frame of your windows, but the inside is just blank or a white/gray box. None of the WPF Controls are visible.

I have found two ways to fix this. One is permanent and one is temporary.

Option 1 – (Permanent) Set this registry key. Read more about this here on MSDN: Graphics Rendering Registry Settings

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Avalon.Graphics]
"DisableHWAcceleration"=dword:00000001

Option 2 – (Temporary) Or just reboot the VM while connected to the VMWare Workstation host via RDP. It seems that the VM boots and the OS detects the lack of support and disabled hardware acceleration. However, once you reboot when you are not RDP’ed into the VMWare Workstation host, you have hardware acceleration back.

I took me a long time to figure this out, because there was little to nothing in a Google search. I came across this solution while looking for something else a month or so ago, and needed to use it again when working from home last night. I thought I would post it so I never have to look for it again.

C# (Mono) on FreeBSD

Well, if you have read my blog at all, you will realize that I have a developer job writing in C# on Windows, but it is my personal hobby to use FreeBSD.

I am very excited about Mono. I love the C# language. I also love FreeBSD.

I am going to go ahead and say something bold. Few people now realize this yet, but the ability to code in C# on open source platforms is going to be the single most important feature in the coming years. It will eventually be a standard library that will exist or be one of the first items installed on every system.

For more information:

http://www.mono-project.com/Mono:FreeBSD
Packaging for Mono and related applications on FreeBSD (http://www.freebsd.org) is handled by the BSD# Project. The purpose of this project is to maintain the existing Mono/C# ports in the FreeBSD ports tree, port new applications, and work on resolving FreeBSD specific issues with Mono. BSD# is entirely user supported and is not an official FreeBSD or Mono project.

For Licensing information:

http://www.mono-project.com/Licensing

Installing Mono

Mono is a port and as always a port is easy to install on FreeBSD.

Note: The version of mono in ports is not necessarily the latest and greated. I recommend that you install the latest version of mono. See this article.
Installing the latest version of Mono on FreeBSD or How to install and use portshaker?

#
#
cd /usr/ports/lang/mono
make BATCH=yes install

Compiling Hello World in Mono

The mono compiler is gmcs. It is simple to compile C# code.

  1. Create a new file called hw.cs. C# class files end in .cs.
  2. Add this text to the file:
    using System;
    
    namespace HelloWorld
    {
         class HelloWorld
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                System.Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
            }
        }
    }
    
  3. Save the file.
  4. Compile the code to create an hw.exe program.
    # gmcs hw.cs

Running a Mono Program

Mono programs must be run using the “mono” command.

# mono hw.exe
Hello World

A Mono IDE: MonoDevelop

There is an IDE for Mono called MonoDevelop. MonoDevelop is a port and as always a port is easy to install on FreeBSD.

#
#
cd /usr/ports/devel/monodevelop
make BATCH=yes install

The Mono Develop port integrated with KDE to add itself to the KDE menu under Applications | Development | MonoDevelop. So you can run it from there.

This IDE allows you to create C# solutions. It is possible to run compile them on FreeBSD and run them on Windows, or compile them on Windows and run them on FreeBSD.

Is It Really Cross Platform

C# and Mono are supposed to be cross platform. So I can write it in Windows using Visual Studio or I can write in FreeBSD using Mono Develop and either way it should run on both Windows and FreeBSD and any other platform that supports mono.

So here are the results of my quick tests:

Test 1 – Does the Hello World app run in Windows.

Yes. I copied the file to a Windows 7 64 bit box and ran it. It worked.

Test 2 – Does a GTK# 2.0 Project run in Windows

No. I created a GTK# 2.0 project on FreeBSD in Mono Develop, and didn’t add anything to it, I just compiled it. I copied the file to windows and ran it. However, it crashed.

Supposedly you have to install the GTK# for .NET on the windows box, but it still didn’t work.

Test 3 – Does a Windows Form Application compiled in Visual Studio 2010 in Window 7 run on FreeBSD

Not at first. I created a basic Windows Form application, and didn’t add anything to it, I just compiled it. I copied it to FreeBSD and ran it. It crashed. However, by default .NET 4.0 is used.

Yes, if compiled with .NET 3.5 or earlier. I changed the project to use .NET 3.5 and tried again. It ran flawlessly.

Test 4 – Does a Windows Presentation Foundation project compiled in Visual Studio 2010 in Window 7 run on FreeBSD

No. There is PresentationFramework assembly so the application crashes immediately. I tried multiple .NET versions.

Note: I didn’t really test much more than the basics. I just created new projects, left them as is and tried them. It would be interesting to see a more fully developed application tested and working on both platform and to know what issues were encountered in doing this.

No WPF

Unfortunately there is no WPF and no plans for it. Of course, WPF stand for Windows Presentation Foundation, and so the who “Windows” part of that might need to be changed to something like XPF, Xorg Presentation foundation.

However since there is Moonlight, which is to Silverlight as Mono is to C# and .NET, and Silverlight is a subset of WPF, I have to assume that WPF will arrive in mono eventually, even if it is by way of Moonlight first.

WPF databinding to methods encapsulated in an ICommand

Databinding in WPF allows binding the Command property to methods encapulated in an ICommand. By creating an ICommand object to hold an event function, the Command value can bind to the event function as an ICommand.

The goal of Model-View-ViewModel is to have zero code in the code behind of a WPF Control Instead, everything the WPF Control does happens using databinding.

While this article will show you how to do this, you be left a little fuzzy as to understanding of the implementation. It may take some time and research to fully understand everything this is doing. Understand that methods can be objects, and this is a process to turn a method object into an ICommand so it can be using in WPF for databinding.

Preparation and Prereqs

You should have Visual Studio 2008/2010.

In Visual Studio, create a new WPF Application project and give it a name.

Step 1 – Creating an new class that inherits from ICommand

  1. In your new project in Visual Studio, add a new class called RelayCommand.
    Note: It can be named anything, but since that is the name used by Microsoft when discussing MVVM, I will use the same name.
  2. Change the using statements to implement the following : System, System.Diagnostic, System.Windows.Input
  3. Make the new RelayComand class public.
  4. Make the new RelayCommand class implement ICommand.
    using System;
    using System.Windows.Input;
    
    namespace WpfDataBindingToICommand
    {
        public class RelayCommand : ICommand
        {
            #region Constructors
            public RelayCommand()
            {
            }
            #endregion
        }
    }
    
  5. Right-click on the ICommand text and choose Implement Interface | Implement Interface. This adds the following code to the bottom of your class.
            #region ICommand Members
    
            public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
    
            public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;
    
            public void Execute(object parameter)
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
    
            #endregion
    
  6. Create two member variables or fields that we will use to hep use inside the ICommand interface functions.
    1. Action
    2. Predicate

            #region Member Variables
            readonly Action<object> _ActionToExecute;
            readonly Predicate<object> __ActionCanExecute;
            #endregion
    
  7. Implement the CanExecute(object parameter) function.
            public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
            {
                return __ActionCanExecute== null ? true : __ActionCanExecute(parameter);
            }
    
  8. Implement the EventHandler CanExecuteChanged. In doing this the MVVM experts used the CommandManager, which might be worth reading about.
            public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
            {
                add { CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value; }
                remove { CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value; }
            }
    
  9. Implement the Execute(object parameter) function.
            public void Execute(object parameter)
            {
                _ActionToExecute(parameter);
            }
    
  10. Create constructors that allow us to initialize the object by passing in the Action

The final class looks as follows:

using System;
using System.Windows.Input;

namespace WpfDataBindingToICommand
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This RelayCommand object is used to encapsulate function logic into an oject that inherits ICommand.
    /// </summary>
    public class RelayCommand : ICommand
    {
        #region Member Variables
        readonly Action<object> _ActionToExecute;
        readonly Predicate<object> _ActionCanExecute;
        #endregion

        #region Constructors
        /// <summary>
        /// This creates a new RelayCommand.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="inActionToExecute">This is the logic of the actin to execute. This objects is usually a method that returns void.</param>
        public RelayCommand(Action<object> inActionToExecute)
            : this(inActionToExecute, null)
        {
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// This creates a new RelayCommand.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="inActionToExecute">This is the logic of the actin to execute. This objects is usually a method that returns void.</param>
        /// <param name="inActionCanExecute">This is the logic for whether the action can execute.</param>
        public RelayCommand(Action<object> inActionToExecute, Predicate<Object> inActionCanExecute)
        {
            if (inActionToExecute == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("execute");

            _ActionToExecute = inActionToExecute;
            _ActionCanExecute = inActionCanExecute;
        }
        #endregion

        #region ICommand Members
        public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
        {
            return _ActionCanExecute == null ? true : _ActionCanExecute(parameter);
        }

        public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
        {
            add { CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value; }
            remove { CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value; }
        }

        public void Execute(object parameter)
        {
            _ActionToExecute(parameter);
        }
        #endregion
    }
}

Step 2 – Creating a ViewModelBase abstract base class

This object is used to create common logic for all objects that will be using in Binding. This object will implement INotifyPropertyChanged so it only has to be implemented once.

  1. Create a new class named ViewModelBase.
  2. Change the using statements to implement the following : System, System.CompenentModel
  3. Make the new ViewModelBase class public and abstract.
  4. Make the new ViewModelBase class implement INotifyPropertyChanged.
  5. Make the constructor protected.
  6. Right-click on the INotifyPropertyChanged text and choose Implement Interface | Implement Interface. This adds the following code to the bottom of your class. Yes, it is just a one line event handler object.
            #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members
    
            public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    
            #endregion
    
  7. Create a function called NotifyPropertyChanged to help implement the object. Make sure it has a permission level of at least protected.
            #region Functions
            protected void NotifyPropertyChanged(String inPropertyName)
            {
                if (PropertyChanged != null)
                {
                    PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(inPropertyName));
                }
            }
            #endregion
    
  8. Make the new ViewModelBase class public and abstract.

The final object looks as follows:

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;

namespace WpfDataBindingToICommand
{
    public abstract class ViewModelBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        #region Constructors
        public ViewModelBase()
        {
        }
        #endregion

        #region Functions
        protected void NotifyPropertyChanged(String inPropertyName)
        {
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(inPropertyName));
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
        #endregion
    }
}

Note: You may also want to implement IDisposable.

Step 3 – Creating the ViewModel and Model

We are going to have the ViewModel and business in the same object for this example, but sometimes you will have a separate ViewModel object that represents your data/business.

  1. Create a new class named SampleViewModel.
  2. Change the using statements to implement the following : System, System.Windows, System.Windows.Input
  3. Make the new SampleViewModel class public.
  4. Make the new SampleViewModel class inherit ViewModelBase.
    using System;
    using System.Windows;
    using System.Windows.Input;
    
    namespace WpfDataBindingToICommand
    {
        public class SampleViewModel : ViewModelBase
        {
            #region Constructors
            public SampleViewModel()
            {
            }
            #endregion
        }
    }
    
  5. Create a string field and property and make sure to have the property’s set function call NotifyPropertyChanged.
        public class SampleViewModel : ViewModelBase
        {
            string _Message = "Hello. This is the default message.";
    
            public string Message
            {
                get { return _Message; }
                set
                {
                    _Message = value;
                    NotifyPropertyChanged("Message");
                }
            }
        }
    
  6. Create a simple function to show a MessageBox.
            public void ShowMessage(String inMessage)
            {
                MessageBox.Show(inMessage);
            }
    
  7. Create an ICommand field and property. Make sure the property returns a RelayCommand object that references the ShowMessage method. This is a read only property.
            RelayCommand _ShowMessageCommand;
    
            public ICommand ShowMessageCommand
            {
                get
                {
                    if (_ShowMessageCommand == null)
                    {
                        _ShowMessageCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.ShowMessage(Message));
                    }
                    return _ShowMessageCommand;
                }
            }
    

    Note: Notice that in order to pass the ShowMessage method, instead of the return value of the function, into the RelayCommand objectwhich is void anyway, the param => syntax is used.

The final SampleViewModel looks as follows.

using System;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Input;

namespace WpfDataBindingToICommand
{
    public class SampleViewModel : ViewModelBase
    {
        #region Member Variables
        string _Message = "Hello. This is the default message.";
        RelayCommand _ShowMessageCommand;
        #endregion

        #region Constructors
        public SampleViewModel()
        {
        }
        #endregion

        #region Properties
        public string Message
        {
            get { return _Message; }
            set
            {
                _Message = value;
                NotifyPropertyChanged("Message");
            }
        }

        public ICommand ShowMessageCommand
        {
            get
            {
                if (_ShowMessageCommand == null)
                {
                    _ShowMessageCommand = new RelayCommand(param => this.ShowMessage(Message));
                }
                return _ShowMessageCommand;
            }
        }
        #endregion

        #region Functions
        public void ShowMessage(String inMessage)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(inMessage);
        }
        #endregion

        #region Enums
        #endregion
    }
}

Step 4 – Using Databinding to Bind an ICommand to a WPF Control

Ok, so lets modify the XAML of the default MainWindow.xaml code that was auto-created with the project. We will keep it simple and have a text box and a button to pop up the message.

Note: For this simple program all the work we did to implement databinding for binding events to methods seems like an absurd burden. However, for large applications, this design will lead to a better way to manage your code. It will decouple your GUI from your code, making future refactoring of the GUI much easier. This also improves the ability to make minor changes to the GUI. It also makes the code more sustainable and more easily tested. Unit tests are more effective as the GUI layer is not required and most functions are in the business layer.

  1. Create a reference to the current namespace.
    <Window x:Class="WpfDataBindingToICommand.MainWindow"
            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
            xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfDataBindingToICommand"
            Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    
  2. Add a SampleViewModel StaticResource.
        <Window.Resources>
            <local:SampleViewModel x:Key="Sample" />
        </Window.Resources>
    
  3. Set the DataContext of the Grid to the SampleViewModel StaticResource.
            <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                <RowDefinition Height="*" />
                <RowDefinition Height="50" />
            </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    
  4. Add two rows to the Grid.
        <Grid DataContext="{StaticResource ResourceKey=Sample}">
    
  5. Add a TextBox and remove the sizing and alignments. Set Margin to 5. Bind the Text property to Message.
            <TextBox Text="{Binding Message}" Name="textBoxMessage" Margin="5"/>
    
  6. Add a button. Set HorizontalAlignment to Right. Set the Width to Auto. Set Margin to 5. Bind the Command property to ShowMessageCommand.
    <Button Command="{Binding ShowMessageCommand}" Content="ShowMessage" Grid.Row="1" Height="23" Name="buttonShowMessage" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Width="Auto" Margin="5"/>
    

You are done. The final XAML is as follows:

<Window x:Class="WpfDataBindingToICommand.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfDataBindingToICommand"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Window.Resources>
        <local:SampleViewModel x:Key="Sample" />
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid DataContext="{StaticResource ResourceKey=Sample}">
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="*" />
            <RowDefinition Height="50" />
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <TextBox Text="{Binding Message}" Name="textBoxMessage" Margin="5"/>
        <Button Command="{Binding ShowMessageCommand}" Content="ShowMessage" Grid.Row="1" Height="23" Name="buttonShowMessage" HorizontalAlignment="Right" Width="Auto" Margin="5"/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

Notice that we never touched the code behind of MainWindow. The GUI and the code are as decoupled as possible. Not event the event functions are needed in the code behind. This decoupling or GUI and code is our goal.

Resources

WPF Apps With The Model-View-ViewModel Design Pattern
Understanding Routed Events and Commands In WPF


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Tutorial – Binding to a member variable object

You have your WPF Window and you have an object that you don’t want to make a static resource. You want to declare it as a member variable in the code.

Example 1 – Binding two TextBox controls to a Person object

  1. Create a New WPF Application Visual Studio.
  2. Create a new Class named Person.cs.
  3. Give it FirstName and a LastName properties.
  4. Configure it to implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface.
  5. Create a NotifyPropertyChanged function that all properties can share (to avoid duplicate code in every single property).
  6. Configure the properties to call the NotifyPropertyChanged function passing in a string that is the name of the property.

    Person.cs

    using System;
    using System.ComponentModel;
    
    namespace WPFPerson
    {
        public class Person : INotifyPropertyChanged
        {
            #region Member Variables
            String _FirstName;
            String _LastName;
            #endregion
    
            #region Constructors
            /*
    		 * The default constructor
     		 */
            public Person()
            {
            }
            #endregion
    
            #region Properties
            public String FirstName
            {
                get { return _FirstName; }
                set
                {
                    _FirstName = value;
                    NotifyPropertyChanged("FirstName");
                }
            }
    
            public String LastName
            {
                get { return _LastName; }
                set
                {
                    _LastName = value;
                    NotifyPropertyChanged("LastName");
                }
            }
            #endregion
    
            #region INotifyPropertyChanged Members
            public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    
            private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String info)
            {
                if (PropertyChanged != null)
                {
                    PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(info));
                }
            }
            #endregion
        }
    }
    
  7. Go back tot he MainWindow.xaml.
  8. Add two labels, and two text boxes, and a button.
  9. Change the text boxes to be populated using binding by adding the following text:
    Text=”{Binding FirstName, Mode=TwoWay}”  

    MainWindow.xaml (WPF Window)

    <Window x:Class="WPFPerson.MainWindow"
            xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
            xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
            Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525" >
        <Grid Name="PersonGrid" >
            <TextBox Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="173,87,0,0" Name="textBoxFirstName" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="234" Text="{Binding FirstName, Mode=TwoWay}" />
            <TextBox Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="173,116,0,0" Name="textBoxLastName" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="234" Text="{Binding LastName, Mode=TwoWay}"/>
            <Label Content="FirstName" Height="28" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="103,85,0,0" Name="labelFirstName" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
            <Label Content="LastName" Height="28" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="103,114,0,0" Name="labelLastName" VerticalAlignment="Top" />
            <Button Content="Defaults" Height="23" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="337,199,0,0" Name="buttonDefaults" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="75" Click="buttonDefaults_Click" />
        </Grid>
    </Window>
    
  10. Double-click the button to create the buttonDefaults_Click event function.
    This also conveniently takes you to the Code Behind of the MainWindow.cs file.
  11. Have the buttonDefaults_Click function update to properties of your _Person object.
    _Person.FirstName = “Jared”;
    _Person.LastName = “Barneck”;
  12. Create a field/member variable using the Person object.
    private readonly Person _Person;
  13. Now in the constructor initialize the object.
    _Person = new Person();
  14. Also in the constructor, make the DataContext for each TextBox the _Person object.
    textBoxFirstName.DataContext = _Person;
    textBoxLastName.DataContext = _Person;  

    MainWindow.cs (Code Behind)

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;
    using System.Windows;
    using System.Windows.Controls;
    using System.Windows.Data;
    using System.Windows.Documents;
    using System.Windows.Input;
    using System.Windows.Media;
    using System.Windows.Media.Imaging;
    using System.Windows.Navigation;
    using System.Windows.Shapes;
    using System.Threading;
    
    namespace WPFPerson
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Interaction logic for MainWindow.xaml
        /// </summary>
        public partial class MainWindow : Window
        {
            private readonly Person _Person;
    
            public MainWindow()
            {
                _Person = new Person();
                InitializeComponent();
                textBoxFirstName.DataContext = _Person;
                textBoxLastName.DataContext = _Person;
            }
    
            private void buttonDefaults_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
            {
                _Person.FirstName = "Jared";
                _Person.LastName = "Barneck";
            }
        }
    }
    
  15. Now Now compile and make sure you don’t have any errors.

Example 2 – Forthcoming…

Example 3 – Forthcoming…

Sources:
http://www.wrox.com/WileyCDA/Section/Windows-Presentation-Foundation-WPF-Data-Binding-with-C-2005.id-305562.html